Reading Time: < 1 minute Tintoretto [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Reading Time: < 1 minute

Is this all we need when considering the Resurrection of Jesus?

When examining artifacts from the past, historians assume that nature worked back then as it does today; otherwise, anything goes. American patriot Thomas Paine, in The Age of Reason, asked: “Is it more probable that nature should go out of her course, or that a man should tell a lie? We have never seen, in our time, nature go out of her course; but we have good reason to believe that millions of lies have been told in the same time; it is, therefore, at least millions to one, that the reporter of the miracle tells a lie.”…

David Hume wrote: “No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle unless that testimony be of such a kind that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavours to establish.”[1]

Could I really just distil my forthcoming book on the Resurrection dow to this pithy quote?

Probably.

[1] Barker, Dan (2008), Godless, Ulysses Press, p. 278-79.

 


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Jonathan MS Pearce

A TIPPLING PHILOSOPHER Jonathan MS Pearce is a philosopher, author, columnist, and public speaker with an interest in writing about almost anything, from skepticism to science, politics, and morality,...