Overview:

Almost 15,000 Christians have signed an online petition which harshly criticizes Greene’s efforts to promote Christian nationalism in government.

Reading Time: < 1 minute

Last week, Republican Georgia Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene made headlines for calling herself a Christian nationalist and promoting religion in government. Now, she is facing pushback from thousands of Christians. 

Almost 15,000 Christians have signed an online petition which harshly criticizes Greene’s efforts to promote Christian nationalism in government. The group that launched the petition, Faithful America, calls itself an online community of Christians working together for social justice. 

The group released a statement alongside the petition. “Christian nationalism is unchristian and unpatriotic. It is defined not as a religion but as a political ideology that unconstitutionally and unbiblically merges Christian and American identities, declaring that democracy does not matter because only conservative Christians are true Americans,” the group said. 

The statement went on to say that: “Christians reject Christian nationalism as a betrayal of our faith — one that inspired the bloody failed coup of January 6, tries to overturn elections, props up white supremacy, repeals equal rights, demonizes its opponents, and intentionally divides the nation.”

Greene had called Christian nationalism a “good thing” and even began selling “Proud Christian Nationalist” t-shirts online. On Trump’s Truth Social network, Greene claimed that the “Godless left” was “relentlessly attacking me for my Christian faith.”

Reverend Dr. Andrew K. Barnett, a Faithful America member and a pastor in Atlanta, called the ideology dangerous. “Christian nationalism is perverse and dangerous, and it must be contested in all its forms. By contrast, the God we encounter in Scripture calls us to love our neighbors as ourselves,” said Barrett.  

Christian nationalism is on the rise in Republican campaigns, even as the percentage of Christian Americans declines in both the overall population and within the electorate. Republicans’ turn towards Christian nationalism could put the liberties of women, the secular community, and religious minorities at risk.

Marcus Johnson

Marcus Johnson is a political commentator and a political science Ph.D. candidate at American University. His primary research focus is the impact of political institutions on the racial wealth gap.